Brexit Postponed to Halloween

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The European Union has agreed to extend the Brexit deadline to a very symbolic date, October 31st.

That happens to be the day the bitcoin whitepaper was published, 31st of October 2008, and of course it is the day of Halloween, an ancient celebration of renewal and re-birth.

Britain will now have to take part in the European elections or leave on or before June the 1st.

That could make European elections relevant for the very first time as Brit-ins and Brexiteers peacefully fight it out through the ballot box.

Following a petition to revoke article 50, which has now reached 6 million signatures, and a march by more than 1 million people to Brit-in, this could be LibDem’s moment to shine.

They are the only major party to campaign on a confirmatory referendum with Liberal Democrats best described as classic liberals: pro social tolerance and pro free market.

They will face banker Farage and other hard Brexiteers who could potentially profit from the chaos of no-deal as arguably many hedge funds did on the Brexit results day.

The results of the European election – if it is taken seriously by all parties – might give the first indication of where the people stand. Will they send “fighters” or will they send olive branches?

Markets have not reacted to this news as in effect nothing has changed. The deadlock remains still in place. The choices remain unappetizing for parliament and the public.

That great house of democracy may need to call a Citizens’ Assembly. Let the ordinary people get the microphone too, see if they can reach any conclusion.

Otherwise this delay might be just the second of many. With a result of 52%-48% and a number of irregularities such as expats’ postal votes not counted due to ostensibly arriving late, with no mandate in the 2017 election, with a new election perhaps giving yet another hung parliament as LibDems might surge, with the decision facing Britain the biggest since Churchill ruled, perhaps this sort of out, but not really out, kicking of the can is maybe what should have been expected.

For there has effectively already been a Brexit of sorts. Germany and France have sort of merged politically. They have laid out historic plans for an EU army. Britain no longer is at the table nor does it really have a veto, but still has all the other rights and obligations.

Being out may well mean being in, but without shared sovereignty in a round table of equals (where some are a bit more equal than others due to veto rights) and without a loud microphone.

Copyrights Trustnodes.com

 

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